Ligurian Rabbit

Ligurian Rabbit

Alessandro Clemente

The dish that we are excited about today is called Ligurian Rabbit. This dish is traditional of the Ligurian region, which spans just east of Monaco through Genoa, and concludes along the Mediterranean coast at the bottom of the Cinque Terre. This region is renowned in Italy for having some of the finest chefs and some of the most unique dishes. This particular dish came to popularity several hundred years ago, when the catching and cooking of rabbits was much more common than today. It became popular all along the western coast of the region and has since spread out eastward, now encompassing much of Northwestern Italy. The dish is heavy and rich, making it a great dinner on colder evenings.

What You’ll Need

  • Three pounds of bone-in rabbit meat
  • 3.5 ounces of Taggiasca olives
  • 1 brown onion
  • 1 rosemary sprig
  • 1 glass of dry red wine
  • 2 whole garlic cloves
  • 1 spoon dried thyme
  • 5 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil
  • Beef broth to taste
  • 2 tablespoons pine nuts
  • 3 bay leaves
  • Salt and pepper to taste

What You’ll Do

  1. Separate your liver, kidneys, and head and chop your rabbit meat into about a dozen pieces. If you have already cut rabbit that will do fine, too.
  2. Chop your garlic and onions very finely and place into a pan on medium heat with all of your olive oil
  3. Allow onion and garlic to simmer for several minutes.
  4. Add the rabbit to the pan and continue cooking. Add your bay leaves after the rabbit has been cooking for several minutes.
  5. Add your chopped rosemary to the pan and continue cooking
  6. Use a pair of tongs to move the rabbit pieces so that they all cook evenly. Allow to cook on medium heat until meat is golden brown throughout
  7. Add your glass of red wine and continue cooking
  8. Add your olives and your rabbit kidney and liver, if you want them included
  9. Next, add all of your pine nuts to the pan and allow to continue to cook
  10. Mix altogether and cover your dish. Allow to cook another hour on low heat until rabbit meat is completely tender
  11. Every 20 minutes add one ladle full of beef broth to the pan and allow it to reduce as it cooks
  12. To serve, place rabbit atop polenta, mashed potatoes, or vegetables and spoon additional cooking sauce to the top for extra flavor!

This rabbit recipe is pretty much as traditional as it gets. Native to the Ligurian region, comprised of the Cinque Terre, this recipe will transport you to a simpler, traditional Italian era!

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